Website Terms & Conditions

Terms and conditions and legal mentions

The hereby Terms and Conditions apply to the website available at the address www.webhelp.com or any other URL address, area or subarea which might be used to host the website later on (hereafter the “Website”), as well as to any research made on the aforesaid Website, and/or any use by the visitor accessing the Website (hereafter the “User”). Any consultation, use or transmission of the Website shall imply User acceptance without reservation of Terms and Conditions hereafter defined.
If you have any question or complaint, you can contact Webhelp here.

1. Intellectual property rights

The Website is processed by Webhelp SAS (hereafter “Webhelp”). Webhelp is the owner or rightful licensee of any components and contents protected by intellectual property rights and available on the Website. Data base, components, contents presentation and all the elements (texts, visuals, photographs, videos, database, etc.), trademarks, logos and area names, which appear on the Website included, are Webhelp property, and where appropriate the property of its partners, and are protected by intellectual property governing laws. The User is granted access to the Website and the pages in accordance with the proposed navigation. All the rights which are not expressly conceded by Webhelp are deemed to be reserved.

No element incorporated in the Website shall be either partly or fully copied, reproduced, extracted from, modified, reedited, charged, denatured, transferred, displayed or distributed, on any support, without Webhelp prior written consent and shall be in compliance with the intellectual property rights and of any other right mentioned. Any unauthorised reproduction of any element of the Website, as well as any unauthorised extraction of data from the Website or from Website database is forbidden and may lead to judicial legal proceedings for counterfeit, unfair competition and damage to image among others.

Where the use of Website elements is authorised through these Terms and Conditions and provided that the source and parenthood of such element is systematically mentioned, such a use should not end up to a denaturation, deterioration, modification, alteration in any manner as the case may be. Where applicable the following mention has to be visible on any authorised copy of any Website component: “Copyright 2018 – Webhelp all rights reserved” followed by a lien redirecting to https://webhelp.com.

2. Hypertext links

Webhelp has no control over third-party website. The existence of hypertext link between the Website and a third-party website does not result in Webhelp giving any kind of guaranties or exercising any kind of responsibility over the content or usage which may be performed on this website. Webhelp shall in any case be separately or jointly held liable with the third-party website publisher whose hypertext links redirect to the Website or to which Website directs to through a hypertext link. More specifically Webhelp shall not be held liable of a third-party website content reachable from a Website page or third-party websites which redirect to a page of the Website through a hypertext link.

Webhelp will make its best to remove Hypertext links pointing to any inappropriate content that you would notify us.

3. Personal data protection

For any additional information regarding Personal Data, cookies used by the Website and Users rights, the User may refer to the section “Website Privacy Policy” or “Webhelp Recruitment Privacy Policy”.

4. Liability

Unless required by any mandatory legal provision, the website is provided on an “as is” and “as available” basis. Webhelp makes, and user receives, in connection with the use of the Website no other warranty, express or implied, including without limitation, the implied warranties of merchantability, of fitness for a particular purpose, or non-infringement. Webhelp do not promise that the Website, or any content service or feature, including any information and documents downloaded by you are free of error or defects, or that the aforementioned will be corrected. The above exoneration can be completed by any provision of the Terms and Conditions.

Unless contradicted by any mandatory legal provision, Webhelp disclaims any and all liability for any damage directly or indirectly suffered by the User or any third party, in connection with or related to the use of any component and content of this Website. Webhelp shall not be held liable for any direct or indirect damage, material or immaterial damage such as, but not limited to loss of profit, loss of chance, loss customer, loss of data, loss of image and / or immaterial damage suffered by the User.

5. Website availability

Even though Webhelp has taken all the necessary steps to ensure the reliability of the information, services, software or products contained on the Site, it cannot be held liable for errors, omissions, viruses or results that could be obtained by misuse of these. Webhelp is actually held only by a simple obligation of means.

The User declares and guarantees that they know the characteristics and the constraints of the Internet and in particular that the transmission of data and information on the Internet only enjoys a relative technical reliability, these circulating on heterogeneous networks with different technical characteristics and capabilities that disrupt access or make it impossible at certain times.

Webhelp strives to keep the Website accessible 24/7, but is under no obligation to do so and therefore provides no guarantee of availability or permanent accessibility or performance. Webhelp and / or its suppliers may / may also interrupt their access, notably for reasons of maintenance and upgrading of the Site or its hosting infrastructure, or any other legitimate reason for Webhelp. Webhelp is in any case responsible for these interruptions and the consequences that may result for the User or any third party. It is also recalled that Webhelp may terminate or modify the characteristics of the Website at any time and without notice.

6. Contents

The User shall be the author or have secured the rights of any content published on the Website being reminded that (i) any publication on the Website equals authorization for Webhelp to reproduce and represent such a content and (ii) the User remains the only responsible for the content.

In any event, the User is the only responsible of the contents he/she would be able to publish on the Website. Therefore, Webhelp rejects any liability regarding words and remarks that could be published on our Website. In particular, the User restrains from holding any unlawful, insulting, defamatory, xenophobic, discriminatory or obscene words as well as harming Privacy, Intellectual Property and rights relating to the personality. Webhelp reserves the right to remove any unlawful words without any notice or damages, without prejudice to any lawsuit against the author of such words. The User guarantees and hold Webhelp non-liable for any complaint, lawsuit or condemnation linked to data and content published by the User on the Website

In any case Webhelp shall be held liable for any loss, deterioration or corruption of User’s Data linked to his/her contribution to the Website. Any information or advice from Webhelp shall not be seen as a guarantee and shall not have any contractual value.

Besides, the User commits to publish contents that are neither malicious nor likely to harm the Website or its hosting infrastructure. Webhelp and/or its processor reserve the faculty to erase without prior notice or damage any content published by a User and harming or likely to harm the good working of the Website, without prejudice to potential lawsuits.

7. Security

Webhelp makes its best efforts to ensure the Website’s security in accordance with applicable rules within the industry. However, the User is aware of the risks inherent to the use of electronic communications and especially the risks linked to the Data delivery on the Internet. In a more general way, it is the User’s duty to implement all the usual protections linked to browsing. Therefore, Webhelp will not guarantee anything in that case.

In any case, the User restrains from any reverse engineering or de-compiling attempt of any part of the website, from any fraudulent intrusion or attempt to fraudulent intrusion within the service system hosting the Website as well as in the software enabling its working; from any breach of trust, theft, erasure, misappropriation or non-authorised modification of the Website’s technical Data, subject to prosecution.

8. Governing legislation

Unless otherwise required by any applicable law, any difficulty, claim or litigation generated by or in relation with the present terms and conditions shall be settled according to French laws. French jurisdictions are fully and solely competent to hear of any legal dispute rising out of these terms and conditions.

9. Legal notices

Website’s publisher:

WEBHELP SAS
Registration number: 431977370
161, rue de Courcelles
75017 Paris
+33 1 44 40 33 40
contact@fr.webhelp.com

Web host:


The future of travel in the post COVID world

The arrival of COVID-19 may have changed the travel industry forever. We’ve asked sector expert, and Webhelp Global Director, Nora Boros, to reflect on how far we have come and, most importantly, what the future holds for this most human of industries?

What was the travel industry landscape prior to COVID-19, were there any ongoing issues, or significant changes on the horizon?

Although it feels like an age away right now, looking back to 2019 the outlook for the travel industry was fairly optimistic and, on the whole, the industry was in a place of maturity in customer experience - especially when compared with other sectors which might be perceived as being weaker in this area such as financial services.

In fact, the industry had developed some depth in the ability to emotionally and personally connect with its audience, in order to deliver unique leisure experiences.  Brands were using new consumer behaviours to create buy in, especially in creating enriched customer journeys, something that I explored in a previous blog.

As travel is such a broad and diverse industry, some disruption was evident and there were emerging players and newcomers to the market, joining travel from competing sectors.

There was the growth of personalised, sustainable and eco-tourism, and its impact on the traditional value, luxury and price based travel campaigns - plus the continued arrival of start-ups, bringing new technology, fresh services and additional booking avenues to the industry.

Unfortunately, some areas of the travel industry were already financially fragile. For example, where low operating margins coincide with high cost in distribution or intermediation. This is especially apparent in models where there are go-betweens such as resellers, who are bridging the gap for providers and the consumers themselves, and draining income flows.

Alongside this, there was the growing financial challenge faced by the traditional retail brick and mortar travel providers from new players in digital technology.

And, there was huge impact from the way that technology can very quickly, change a regional provider to a global one – going digital provides the ability to easily disseminate an offer across multiple geographies and languages.

Interestingly, at Webhelp we are in the perfect position to provide support in this area, creating a unified customer experience across multiple markets.

What was the initial response to COVID-19 from the industry, and what challenges did Webhelp face as a company?

In the past decade, the travel industry has weathered many storms, including the ash cloud crisis in 2010 and the impact of the tragic events of 9/11. So when COVID hit, there was the awareness that it was going to hurt – but it was approached with a certain amount of resilience.

We saw a significant drop in sales volumes across our existing client operations, which we approached with a high degree of flexibility. As a people first company, we value our people and moved to protect them with swift workforce management measures like redeployment and adapted hours while working to reduce negative financial impact on our clients.

The travel industry has a substantial learning curve when producing the best customer advisors, particularly in the airline, tour-operating and hospitality segment. There must be a deep understanding of the sector, tools and processes – which can only be provided by time-served and highly trained advisors.

We focussed on retaining this wealth of experience; we knew that once the immediate challenge passed, our clients would need a highly skilled service.

And, it’s important to note, that as sales volumes fell, customer service needs in areas like refunds, information and rescheduling rose dramatically.  We protected the industry and our clients by cross-skilling advisors, redeploying them and introducing homeworking, where possible, to protect our people and ensure continuation of service.

We have also deployed automation where possible to accelerate digital transformation at a lower cost.

We entered a crisis discussion with one of our clients, who were understandably deeply concerned for their business and were considering calling off their contract. In response we provided a clear and robust financial roadmap through the crisis, working with local legislation to retain our people, safeguard their salaries and reduce the financial drain on our client and the ability to re-invest the savings to the post-crisis situation.

And now, as the industry is gradually returning to business under the next normal, our client is in an ideal position to come back strongly – and appreciates the flexibility, cost reduction and value Webhelp brought to the long term relationship.

Can we touch on the impact of COVID from an air travel perspective?

Yes, obviously the global travel industry has a symbiotic relationship with the airline industry, because travel by its very nature is closely linked to transportation.

The past three months have created a highly unusual situation, with limited (or no) cross border transportation and grounding several airlines.  This is without a doubt one of the single largest crisis’ to hit ANY industry, and we will see ripples and consequences for the next decade, if not longer.

There will be lasting consumer trends resulting from this, including a renewed interest in sustainable tourism and more purposeful, meaningful travel.

The recovery period for airlines may create a decrease in availability resulting in a potential price increase, both for the leisure market and particularly for business travellers. I think that for the corporate market, recovery will be much longer, and many companies will need to adapt their propositions to suit this new reality.

As a consequence we should see short term growth in domestic markets, as people have less in their pockets and less opportunity for international travel. There will be a return to travel as a simpler and more meaningful activity, with family relationships and new experiences assuming greater importance as some global destinations are limited.

The way ahead for the industry and your thoughts on the future of Travel under COVID-19?

Transformation and restructuring will be visible across the whole industry, which is already evident in the actions of Ryanair and British Airways and hotel chains like Marriott and Hilton. Travel companies will need focused customer experience during this difficult time and Webhelp can really support operational and digital transformation in this area.

Change is certainly ahead for the hospitality industry, and some independent hotels could struggle to comply with the new social distancing regulations, reduced guests and increased costs required to stay open while maintaining the bottom line.

Travel brands, like Airbnb, Booking.com and Expedia, with more diversified portfolios or private rentals where new regulations and safety measures can be introduced quickly, may be in a position to benefit.

As we live more flexible work lives, leisure travel will become blended with business needs, creating the new travel concept of ‘Bleisure’, something that we will be exploring in future blogs.

The real trends will become more apparent in the first quarter of next year, as the financial and social effects of COVID become clearer.

And finally, I think that the human experience of travel, the need for personal contact and connection will be increasingly valued and promoted.

Travel is the most universal way to unlock boundaries and understand how diverse and beautiful the world is, and I am confident that the industry will recover and remerge. It may be changed but will remain just as meaningful.

In future blogs we will explore the travel horizon in further detail, re-imagining the customer experience and looking at how this can unlock meaningful opportunities for the travel industry. Feel free to contact Nora Boros via LinkedIn and to explore more of our services.