What does great customer service sound like?

customer-relationship

My colleague David recently blogged about delivering the experience your customers expect and suggests that it’s time to put CX on the board agenda as a #1 priority - the 93% statistic highlights that it’s now essential to deliver a great experience.

Micah Solomon recently also wrote an interesting article in Forbes magazine about how sounds can be much more important to a customer experience than one might immediately imagine. He cites the example of a hotel where he can hear the surf on a beach and the bar plays relaxing music - all carefully considered to ensure that the acoustics of the hotel make it a relaxing place to be.

This article makes an important point around how the customer experience can be designed.

Sound is just one aspect, but it gives several good examples of how thinking about sound use can be important:

  • In a hotel, is your room quiet enough for sleep or do you endlessly hear the nearby elevator rumbling past?
  • In a bar or restaurant, is the music loud enough to provide an attractive ambience, but quiet enough for a conversation to take place?
  • In an airport, are the important announcements made on a system that is clear or one that sounds like feedback during a loud rock concert?
  • On a bus or train, does the staff actively discourage passengers from playing music or movies on their phones without using earphones?
  • In a hospital waiting room, do the chairs squeak and equipment rattles around noisily?

Some of these examples may sound trivial, although sleeping all night next to an elevator isn’t trivial if you want to work the next day. However, what Micah is saying is that when considering your customer experience it is not only the big things that count.

Yes, you might offer customer support 24/7 across a range of channels, but have you really worn the shoes of your customer and experienced how your service sounds, looks, and feels? Can brands afford to ignore the needs of today’s connected customers? This paper examines what a truly omni-channel experience delivers to customers, why it’s good for business and the steps needed to achieve it.

These ideas around senses and the customer experience are important because how the customer feels is what they will remember. Make them feel great and they will return time and time again. What do you think about this idea around senses? Leave a comment below and let me know, or get in touch on LinkedIn.

 


United: three steps to avoiding a similar customer backlash

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The recent problems of United Airlines have been well documented and I wouldn’t like to comment on specific incidents - we have all read so much about the passenger being removed from an overbooked flight now that there is little value in adding one more opinion on the story. However, there are some important lessons that can be learned from this, and other recent airline incidents.

In a business like airlines, how the customer feels is important and forms a great deal of the overall customer experience. Many airlines have been struggling financially and have been cutting back on every possible frill and luxury so air travel today certainly does not feel like the exciting experience it used to be.

So customer expectations have been reduced, but so long as an airline offers comfort and safety perhaps that’s enough? I don’t think so. I think there is still room to surprise the customer, even after all the costs have been stripped out of the business and those free glasses of wine are a thing of the past.

Look at this story of how a Southwest pilot held up a departure because a passenger was running late. The passenger would have had no chance to see his dying grandson if he missed that flight and the pilot personally delayed it by not boarding the plane himself. What’s important to note is that the airline supported their employee and said he made the right decision to help this customer - even if it delayed others. They supported the decision of their employee and clearly they empower their team to make decisions that can improve the customer experience.

Contrast this with the response United gave after the passenger removal incident. They talked to the media and blamed the customer for being belligerent. The CEO misread how the public felt when he emailed every staff member saying they did the right thing. This has now led to a constant stream of negative stories about the brand. In many cases, other passenger removals are clearly justifiable, but in the current atmosphere they just add fuel to the fire of a PR disaster.

I believe there are three key steps any brand should take when faced with a challenging situation like the recent incident at United Airlines:

  1. Apologise: act fast and apologise. Also, make sure you use the same channels your customers are using. If the storm of complaint is centered on YouTube then quickly film a message from the CEO and get it on YouTube. Don’t wait for the print media the next day - act immediately.
  2. Investigate: many incidents are complex and can be viewed in a different way by different people with different information. Make sure you investigate impartially to get the facts and then publish them openly. It might be that the investigation proves that the brand was right and the customer was wrong, but that doesn’t mean the apology is not essential when the storm is raging.
  3. Improve: use the investigation to improve your service so the incident cannot be repeated - learn from your own mistakes.

In industries like air travel there is a need for rules and compliance to ensure passenger safety, but there is also room for employees to have enough flexibility to create a great experience for the customer. However, when things do go wrong these three simple steps can avoid a costly PR meltdown and customer backlash. What do you think about these lessons? Leave a comment below and let me know, or get in touch on LinkedIn.


Multilingual Hubs – When Two Heads Are Not Better Than One

The phrase ‘two heads are better than one’ is commonly accepted in the context of collaborative working and idea sharing, but when it comes to maintaining service consistency and reducing costs in a multilingual contact centre environment, the fewer heads the better. And Netflix’s recent announcement that it would be creating 400 multilingual roles in its customer contact centre in the Netherlands is evidence that multilingual ‘heads’ are highly prized.

Leading global customer experience provider, Webhelp, has invested heavily in a robust solution to meet the language, cost and service challenges of its clients. To do this, Webhelp has augmented its portfolio of single language sites by creating multilingual hubs in strategic locations as part of a transformational approach to delivering outstanding customer service it terms ‘Bestshoring’.

Determining the right multilingual strategy - whether that means full service, service consolidation or shifting to digital channels for example - becomes that much easier when established locations and skilled teams are available and ready to speak the customer’s language. Bestshoring leverages Webhelp’s customer management expertise and infrastructure to deliver high quality multilingual, multichannel conversations that maximise cost efficiency and deliver scalability and flexibility.

Matthieu Bouin, director of strategy and new lines of business at Webhelp, said: “As more and more businesses have an international customer base, the ability to offer round the clock consistent customer experiences in the language and channel of the customer’s choice is becoming increasingly important. Much is made of the need to communicate with customers via the channel of their choice. Webhelp takes that one step further and offers the ability to communicate with customers via the channel and in the language of their choice, backed up by the inherent benefits of our robust operational footprint.”

 

Webhelp employs almost 2,000 multilingual advisors in hubs in Greece, the Netherlands, Portugal, Germany, Romania and the Czech Republic and can offer clients a consistent level of service across a range of different languages.

Athens, Enschede, Lisbon, Stuttgart, Bucharest and Prague were chosen by Webhelp because of a sustainable supply of people with exceptional language skills, combined with a strong work ethic and customer service orientation. In addition, these attractive cities offer excellent infrastructure, local and economic support, and strong transportation links.

From each multilingual hub, Webhelp can handle up to 23 languages depending on the location. The languages currently available are: French, English, Dutch, German, Swedish, Arabic, Danish, Norwegian, Italian, Finnish, Turkish, Polish, Spanish, Russian, Portuguese, Czech, Croatian/Bosnian/Serbian, Hungarian, Greek, Romanian, Slovak, Hebrew, and Lebanese. These languages can all be delivered across multiple channels including voice, email, videoconferencing, social, chat, forums, back office and self-service.

The actual Bestshoring ‘fit’ for clients depends on the scale and nature of customer demand. If the customer base is large, but most or all of them speak the same language and are located in the same country, one site where one language is spoken could also be an ideal solution, rather than a multilingual hub. This location can be on-, near-, or offshore, depending on factors such as cost, cultural considerations and interaction complexity. Webhelp has a large number of single language sites to cater for native language speaking requirements and therefore these tend to be based in the country where the language is most widely spoken; for instance, French from Rabat, English from Glasgow or South Africa, and German from Dortmund.

David Turner, CEO of Webhelp UK said: “The quality, scalability, flexibility, resilience and cost benefits of a Bestshoring strategy for our clients are clear and proven. But our people benefit too. Gone are the days when a job as a contact centre advisor wasn’t considered a viable career option. We are proud to offer educated and qualified people rewarding, long-term careers and the ability to use their language skills to deliver great customer experiences. In addition to promotion opportunities, one of the benefits of Webhelp’s global footprint is that our people can make location choices too. We are delivering so many languages from so many different hubs that this opens up possibilities for our people to travel, experience new cultures, and even to relocate.”

 

It’s time to forget the outdated practices of offshoring as a means of offering cheaper customer experiences - far too often at the expense of customer satisfaction. A well-tailored Bestshoring solution allows organisations to reap cost benefits while increasing levels of customer satisfaction through delivering consistent levels of service and native, or near native, language skills across multiple channels.

To read our white paper on the subject click here

 


Delivering the experience your customers expect

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Imagine if 93% of your customers said they all want the same thing. Would you build a strategy around ensuring you deliver this? Of course, it makes sense. If 93% of customers say that this attribute is important then how can you ignore what almost all of them want?

This 93% figure actually relates to customer experience. According to a new research report that studied 1,000 British consumers, 93% said that they are more likely to make a purchase if they have a positive customer experience. With a response like this, it’s clear that CX planning needs to be at the top of every executive agenda.

My colleague Helen recently blogged about the disconnect between CX being a strategic priority for most executives and their failure to actually deliver a really great experience.

But customers say that the experience they have varied according to the channel used. Under half (47%) of consumers said they were happy with the experience received on the web, email, social media and chat and under a third (32%) of consumers were satisfied with retail service on Twitter, 38% on Facebook, 51% on chat, 56% on the web and 59% on email. In-store, by contrast, 78% were happy with the service they received.

Those figures are a disturbing read. Under half of online and social customers enjoy the experience they are getting from companies. Even the 78% of customers happy with in-store experiences is not very close to the 93% who say that a great experience makes them more likely to purchase.

In a different, but also recent, research report, it was noted that only 38% of companies are personalising their approaches to customers. This is also concerning. Customers are increasingly sophisticated. They have seen brands like Amazon offering personalised recommendations and offers for years. Why are only a third of other brands offering personal choices today?

Both these research reports show that customers are expecting more than most companies are offering. There will always be a lag between what the most switched-on customers expect and what can really be offered, but some of these numbers are concerning. It’s time to put CX on the board agenda as a #1 priority - the 93% statistic highlights that it’s now essential to deliver a great experience.

Can retailers afford to ignore the needs of today’s connected customers? In very many ways, the omni-channel future has arrived; the omni-channel customer certainly has. This paper examines what a truly omni-channel experience delivers to customers, why it’s good for business and the steps needed to achieve it.

What do you think about these research findings? Leave a comment below and let me know, or get in touch on LinkedIn.


Webhelp Develops Performance Compass to Improve Customer Experience

Leading global customer experience and business process outsourcing company, Webhelp, has developed a new tool that allows it to monitor and manage the performance of its advisors in a consistent way across the business and ensure they are receiving the right coaching and development.

Webhelp’s Performance Compass, which has taken a team of 13 people 18 months to develop, combines operational performance and coaching session measures to clearly show the impact coaching is having on an advisor. This allows adjustments and improvements to be made on an ongoing basis and the delivery of coaching that is specific to each individual advisor’s needs.

David Turner, CEO of Webhelp UK, said: “We needed to create a tool to allow us to manage the performance of our advisors in a consistent way across all our sites. Previously, in campaigns where performance data was available, this data would be processed and presented locally using home-grown templates, so it was impossible to verify and compare the reports.  Not only was this process inconsistent but it required a local resource in each campaign, or on each site, to produce reports on a weekly basis. Clearly this placed a huge burden on our resources. The development of our Performance Compass addresses these concerns with respect to consistency, accuracy and efficiency, on many levels.”

 

The ability to deliver coaching that can ensure a consistent level of service across advisors, campaigns and sites is something that Webhelp is proud to be able to offer its clients.

Turner continued: “We now have the ability to create a working prototype Performance Compass, from a Visual Order Form, in minutes.  This demonstrates our capability to prospective and existing clients alike.  We now have more than 50 instances of the product operating in the UK and South Africa and we have more visibility over performance data and coaching data than we have ever had. This ensures we can offer our clients and increasingly high quality level of service from whichever site we operate from.”

 

This ability to monitor and manage performance in a faster and more consistent way is what Webhelp believes is the way forward for delivering the highest levels of customer experience in a cost effective way.

 


Does customer service still need the human touch?

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Technology is changing how brands and customers interact faster than ever; almost everything we think of today as “normal” did not even exist a decade ago. In turn, customer expectations are evolving and changing when it comes to interacting with customer service professionals. Look at the various areas of dramatic change that customer experience teams are facing at present, and the impact they are having on customer expectations:

  • Robotic process automation (RPA): many back office tasks can be automated using intelligent programs. Forrester Research said that the RPA market was worth $250m last year, but will be $2.9b by 2021. If any repetitive customer service task can be handed over to the robots, will customers lose patience with brands that still require a conversation with an advisor to get the simple things done?
  • Channel explosion: an enormous rise in the different ways that a customer can interact with a brand. Voice, chat, email, text, apps, social networks, and review sites are all now commonly used for customers to interact with brands.
  • Omni-channel: a focus on blending the in-store experience with digital channels and ensuring that, however a customer interacts they always have the same great experience. This whitepaper examines what a truly omni-channel experience delivers to customers, why it’s good for business and the steps needed to achieve it.
  • Artificial intelligence: using systems that can capture every customer interaction and learn so future customers can be guided by the system or the system can support a human advisor - offering “experience” of past problems and solutions. The system will always know the answer, so real people are better able to support customers.
  • Big data: brands have enormous databases of information, including customer preferences and behaviour. With big data analysis, it is possible to offer customers special offers and deals designed exclusively just for them – targeting an audience of one.
  • Internet of things (IoT): many new connected devices will start contacting customer service for help directly, without waiting for the owner to get in touch. A good example will be cars that self-diagnose problems and only alert the customer when intervention is needed.

These technologies are not only affecting expectations – they are causing profound changes to the type of service that is now delivered. However, various innovations are evolving at different speeds, and may be of different importance to different industries. How can you decide where to focus and invest?

Industries like financial services are seeing a change not just in the approach to customer service, but even how services are delivered. New market entrants are building solutions entirely based on the needs of the customer and therefore offering services that appear to be far superior to what customers are used to in traditional banks.

These technologies I mentioned are only the tip of the iceberg. There is a technological revolution taking place. But where does that leave the humans? Traditionally, successful interactions with other people have always been essential for great customer service, whether it was with the front of house team in a hotel, the cashier in a supermarket, or a contact centre advisor.

Are we entering a customer service age that is post-human? I don’t think so. I see all these technologies as supportive of what we are achieving with human-focused contact centres, but what’s your view? How fast do you think these technologies might take over - if ever? Let me know your thoughts by leaving a comment here, or get in touch on LinkedIn, and let me know.


HOE BEACONS DE RETAILWERELD VERANDEREN

Beacons, ooit van gehoord? Het zijn kleine zendertjes die via bluetooth een signaal uitzenden. Via dit signaal kunnen beacons verbinding maken met mobiele apparaten en zijn ze in staat de exacte locatie van de gebruiker te bepalen. Daarnaast kunnen ze worden gebruikt om telefoongebruikers op de hoogte te stellen van een interessante aanbieding of actie.

Een onderzoek van Google laat zien hoe snel beacons de retailwereld veranderen. Alleen al de Android toestellen vragen op dit moment meer dan 40 miljard keer per jaar om beacon gerelateerde content. Meer dan een miljoen nieuwe beacons zullen dit jaar nog worden geïnstalleerd in Amerikaanse winkels.

Proximity-technologieën, zoals beacons, kunnen een grote invloed hebben op de manier waarop verkopers omgaan met hun klanten. Een retailer wil het liefst dat zijn applicatie meteen in de winkel wordt gebruikt. Maar beacons kunnen ook ingezet worden voor het verzenden van pushberichten naar telefoons die in de buurt zijn.

Je zou zelfs kunnen zeggen dat de telefoon aan de consument vraagt of hij een website wil bezoeken. De website is dan verbonden met een product in de buurt van de klant. Retailers hebben de afgelopen jaren geprobeerd beacons te combineren met app-downloads. In de praktijk was dat niet altijd even makkelijk. Beacons functioneren namelijk het beste wanneer een app is gelinkt met de verkoper die de klant kan lokaliseren. Maar het lijkt erop dat beacons een comeback beleven. Tegenwoordig kunnen beacons makkelijk en snel geïntegreerd worden in een groot aantal Google apps en -producten. Winkeliers kunnen de consument op deze manier beter bereiken.

Verkopers leggen steeds meer de focus op de het verbeteren van de klantbeleving in de winkels en consumenten zijn gewend geraakt aan online winkelen. Omdat online alles gepersonaliseerd is, kunnen winkels gespecialiseerde adviezen en aanbiedingen doen op basis van de wensen van de klant. Het was niet eenvoudig deze beleving ook in winkels te creëren. Beacons kunnen hier een grote toegevoegde waarde hebben doordat ze retailers een gedetailleerd klantbeeld kunnen bieden.

We zijn van mening dat dit ervoor zorgt dat de twijfel over deze technologie verdwijnt en beacons een belangrijke impact krijgen op de omnichannel beleving. Hoe staat u tegenover het gebruik van deze technologie en wat denkt u dat het effect zal zijn? Geef hieronder uw mening, of neem contact op via LinkedIn.


Helping customers beat card fraud with biometric security

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Mastercard recently announced a new version of their cards that features a built-in fingerprint recognition system. This is an important development for the card sector as fraud in the UK alone is running at almost £1bn - something needs to be done. But is this the right way to approach the problem?

 

Both banks and customers want to prevent card fraud. At present most banks take the loss when cards are used fraudulently. Even when the customer has their lost money returned, it is still a lot of trouble to manage the refund - time must be spent reviewing all purchases to let the bank know which were genuine and which were not.

 

Building the fingerprint recognition into the card itself, as Mastercard is testing, does fix one major problem. If retailers need biometric security systems, it may take time to roll out the fingerprint readers to every possible location. However, building this into the card itself might also be seen as a temporary solution.

 

Take a look at the cash machines (ATMs) used in markets such as Japan and Brazil. Customers register biometric details, such as a print of their hand, and then they can access their account and get cash without any card at all. If the bank recognises a customer based on biometrics then why would you need a card?

 

Services like Apple Pay have popularised the use of mobile phones for payment. Modern smartphones (iPhone 6 onwards) are equipped with a chip that can be used like a contactless card - just tap your phone on a register to make a purchase.

 

It seems that ultimately the best future for retailers, banks, and customers will be when payments can be easily made just by allowing a biometric test. The only difficulty will be modifying retail systems to support a card-free environment. The retailer will need to have a list of all your possible payment accounts so that scanning your hand or eye, then presents the option ‘which account would you like to use?’ The retailer also needs the scanning equipment.

 

The Mastercard idea might well be the best step towards this future without cards. USA only introduced a chip and pin card security two years ago, when the same system has been in use in Europe since 1990s. It can take time to harmonise standards globally. It would not be possible for UK to abolish cards if they are still required in other markets, but I think the fingerprint system shows that biometric security is the future for customers.

 

Will biometric security really prevent the card fraud? If you have any suggestions, please leave a comment here or connect with me on LinkedIn.


Webhelp Celebrates 740 Years of Excellent Service

Leading global customer experience expert Webhelp has celebrated 740 years of dedicated customer service from a total of 66 colleagues at a gala dinner at Cameron House Hotel, Loch Lomond, on Saturday, May 6.

The colleagues, from sites in Falkirk, Dearne Valley, Kilmarnock, Dunoon and Rothesay, were rewarded for 10, 15 and 20 years of service to the business, its clients and their customers.

Webhelp’s chief operating officer, Andy Doig, was on hand to present the awards. He said: “I am tremendously proud to be able to recognise 66 people from within our business for at least 10 years of hard work and dedication.

“Sometimes people have the impression that contact centre work is just something you do until a better option comes along. This is proof that people can build genuinely satisfying and rewarding careers with Webhelp and in the contact centre industry.

“The people we have recognised tonight work in different parts of the business, from customer service advisors to bid solution managers, and this shows that there is a range of career options available to people at Webhelp.

“Our people are our most important asset and Webhelp is extremely grateful to these 66 role models for their commitment and support. I look forward to celebrating with them again in another five years!”

Almost 50 of the Long Service Award winners and their partners attended a special evening at the famous Cameron House Hotel on the shores of Loch Lomond, hosted by chief operating officer, Andy Doig and Webhelp’s people director, Gillian Campbell.

They were given a certificate, a £40 voucher to spend at Cameron House Hotel and vouchers for £100 (for 10 years’ service), £150 (for 15 years’ service) or £200 (for 20 years’ service) each.

The full list of recipients is:

20 years’ service

20 years service - Rothesay - smallCarol Park               -        Contact centre associate                -        Rothesay

Kevin Sayers           -        Enterprise architect                       -        Rothesay

15 years’ service

15 years service - Falkirk - small

Lesley Barbour         -        Team leader                                -        Falkirk

Graeme Evans         -        Team leader                                -        Falkirk

Maxine Jack             -        Contact centre associate                -        Falkirk

Barbara Kane           -        Team leader                                -        Falkirk

Lauren McMillan        -        Team leader                                -        Falkirk

John McVey             -        Contact centre associate                -        Falkirk

David Robertson       -        Facilities contracts manager           -        Falkirk

Louise Sherrit           -        Team leader                                -        Falkirk

Marianne Colquhoun  -        Contact centre associate                -        Dunoon

Sarah Cox               -        Team leader                                -        Dunoon

Sheila Hodgson         -        Team leader                               -        Dunoon

Martin Lilley             -        Contact centre associate               -        Rothesay

10 years’ service

10 years service - DV - small

Daniel Harrop           -        Deputy team leader                      -        Dearne Valley

David Nixon             -        Contact centre associate               -        Dearne Valley

Gavin Morris            -        Contact centre associate               -        Dearne Valley

Janine Ball               -        Contact centre associate               -        Dearne Valley

Karen Smith            -        Contact centre associate               -        Dearne Valley

Kelly Wraight           -        Contact centre associate               -        Dearne Valley

Kier Jeffrey             -        Contact centre associate               -        Dearne Valley

Lisa Burd                 -        Contact centre associate               -        Dearne Valley

Louise Holden           -        Contact centre associate               -        Dearne Valley

Michelle McDonald     -        Contact centre associate               -        Dearne Valley

Patricia Bramhall       -        Contact centre associate               -        Dearne Valley

Patricia Gee             -        Contact centre associate               -        Dearne Valley

Kirsty McSweeney     -        Quality co-ordinator                      -        Dearne Valley

Robert Pellegrin        -        Contact centre associate               -        Dearne Valley

Stephanie May         -        Contact centre associate               -        Dearne Valley

Stephen Murphy       -        Contact centre associate               -        Dearne Valley

Susan Thompson      -        Contact centre associate               -        Dearne Valley

Terry Mason            -        Contact centre associate               -        Dearne Valley

Roy Taylor               -        Deputy team leader                      -        Dearne Valley

Thomas Aram          -        Contact centre associate               -        Dearne Valley

Zyla Hussain            -        Contact centre associate               -        Dearne Valley

10 years service - Falkirk

Derek Anderson       -        Head of performance optimisation   -        Falkirk

Caroline Arnott         -        Contact centre associate               -        Falkirk

Michelle Bell             -        Contact centre associate               -        Falkirk

Freda Bramham       -        Contact centre associate               -        Falkirk

Lianne Campbell       -        Customer experience manager       -        Falkirk

Brian Hastings -        UK financial controller                   -        Falkirk

Richard Kelly            -        Team leader                               -        Falkirk

Christine MacKay      -        Contact centre associate               -        Falkirk

Anne McIntosh         -        Contact centre associate               -        Falkirk

Gemma-Louise Miele -        Team leader                               -        Falkirk

Graham Scott          -        Bid and solutions manager             -        Falkirk

Michael Whitsed        -        Operations manager                     -        Falkirk

10 years service - Kilmarnock - small

Frances Blackshaw    -        Contact centre associate               -        Kilmarnock

Gillian Bland             -        Team leader                               -        Kilmarnock

Marion Gilchrist         -        Contact centre associate               -        Kilmarnock

Rodger King             -        L&CD business partner                  -        Kilmarnock

Darran Logie            -        Contact centre associate               -        Kilmarnock

Andrew McIntyre      -        Senior IT technician                      -        Kilmarnock

Robert Paterson       -        Contact centre associate               -        Kilmarnock

Amanda Burns         -        Operational support co-ordinator     -        Kilmarnock

Gary Strachan          -        Operations manager                     -        Kilmarnock

Cherie Templeton      -        Deputy operations manager           -        Kilmarnock

Fiona Wallace           -        Contact centre associate               -        Kilmarnock

10 years service - Rothesay

John Bommer          -        Contact centre associate               -        Rothesay

Thomas Hood           -        Contact centre associate               -        Rothesay

Margaret Lamont      -        Contact centre associate               -        Rothesay

Kathleen Rodger       -        Contact centre associate               -        Rothesay

10 years service - Dunoon - small

Susan Bouyer          -        Contact centre associate               -        Dunoon

Francesca Flint         -        Contact centre associate               -        Dunoon

David Miller              -        Contact centre associate               -        Dunoon

 

 


Webhelp Celebrates 75 Years of Excellent Customer Experience in Dunoon

Leading global customer experience expert Webhelp has celebrated 75 years of dedicated customer service from a total of six colleagues at a gala dinner at Cameron House Hotel, Loch Lomond, on Saturday, May 6.10 years service - Dunoon - small

 

The colleagues were rewarded for 10 and 15 years of service to the business, its clients and their customers.

Webhelp’s chief operating officer, Andy Doig, was on hand to present the awards. He said: “I am tremendously proud to be able to recognise these people from our Dunoon site for at least 10 years of hard work and dedication to our business.

“Sometimes people have the impression that contact centre work is just something you do until a better option comes along. This is proof that people can build genuinely satisfying and rewarding careers with Webhelp and in the contact centre industry.

“The people we have recognised tonight work in different parts of the business, from customer service advisors to team leaders, and this shows that there is a range of career options available to people at Webhelp.

“Our people are our most important asset and Webhelp is extremely grateful to these role models for their commitment and support. I look forward to celebrating with them again in another five years!”

 

The Long Service Award winners and their partners were invited to attend a special evening at the famous Cameron House Hotel on the shores of Loch Lomond, hosted by Andy Doig and Webhelp’s people director, Gillian Campbell.

They were given a certificate, a £40 voucher to spend at Cameron House Hotel and vouchers for £100 (for 10 years’ service) or £150 (for 15 years’ service).

The full list of Dunoon-based recipients is:

15 years’ service

Marianne Colquhoun  -        Contact centre associate                -        Dunoon

Sarah Cox               -        Team leader                                -        Dunoon

Sheila Hodgson         -        Team leader                               -        Dunoon

10 years’ service

Susan Bouyer          -        Contact centre associate               -        Dunoon

Francesca Flint         -        Contact centre associate               -        Dunoon

David Miller              -        Contact centre associate               -        Dunoon

Picture caption: Francesca Flint (centre left) and David Miller (centre right) celebrating 10 years of working at Webhelp with chief operating officer, Andy Doig (left) and people director, Gillian Campbell (right).