The transformation of B2B sales

Meet those who make the modern B2B go-to market: “inside sales” sellers. Driven by changing B2B buying behavior, the sedentary selling model is evolving beyond simple optimization in a period where physical business interactions have fallen by more than 50%.

According to FEVAD, in 2020, 79% of French SMEs have requested a rate for a B2B purchase on the internet, even before contacting a seller. The change in sales models seems to have become unavoidable, accelerated by confinements as interactions with prospects and customers can no longer be done face-to-face, ” nevertheless, everything must be done to develop customer portfolios”, explains Gautier Romani, an inside sales representative operating for a Webhelp client. Gautier continues, “The proposal for meetings using channels as varied as they are complementary – social networks, mail, etc. – has been intensified to take advantage of the increased available time of our contacts”. The B2B customer has gained knowledge of the offers, thanks to more simplified access to information. As a result, sellers can now focus on the higher value-added elements of the business proposition.

A win/win relationship

Salespeople are doing well, thanks to the pool of information at their disposal (browsing history, sales statistics, etc.) which allows them to continue the purchasing cycle on different channels. This variety encourages them to be proactive in supporting the client and confirming his enlightened choice. “The inside sales must not only know its product, but master its environment (competitive advantages, market trends, etc.). The business now corresponds more to delivering expertise to its client via the right communication channel, mostly via LinkedIn today. “Once Social Selling is mastered, we gain access to a space of more promising business opportunities than in 3 days of face-to-face trade shows”. This leads to rethinking its approach to the customer: how to start the relationship, at what pace to follow up, etc. These are points that are too often underestimated,” Gautier concludes.

Account Based Marketing (ABM): effective under certain conditions

Targeting professionals based on demographic data has become the key asset of sedentary salespeople who employ ABM. This strategy consists of targeting key accounts while sending specific messages; by sector and for each profile of decision-makers showing the most appetite. Rather reserved for targeting mid-cap companies and beyond, this approach is more thorough, but has a conversion rate 5 times higher than the average. “To do this, it is necessary to map the targeted company, analyze its environment, its market, its competitors, and also identify decision-makers or influencers, to send them personalized messages.” Underlines Luc Massias, Business Development Executive at Webhelp.

Outsourcing your B2B sales force allows you to accelerate your commercial growth.

Further reading: B2B Inside Sales Generation

 

Get in touch with our experts to find out more.

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legal framework

Legal frameworks of content moderation around the world (Part 2)

CMM_Legal_Frameworks_Web_Header

Internationally, two documents provide freedom of expression protection. The first is Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), and the second is Article 19 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR). The importance of free speech and free expression are recognized as fundamental human rights with caution of unjustly infringing on them.

By obliging social media platforms to delete illegal content within 24 hours or otherwise face exorbitant fines, the NetzDG triggered fierce debates and concerns regarding its ramification on freedom of expression by:

  • The Streisand effect (detrimental outcomes of censorship)
  • Accidental removal of legal content
  • Privatized law enforcement
  • Unnecessary sanctions
  • Global Internet censorship through authoritarian regimes

At least 13 different countries have enacted or outlined laws that are similar to the NetzDG matrix. According to the Freedom House’s Freedom on the Net, five of them (Honduras, Venezuela, Vietnam, Russia, and Belarus) are ranked as “not free”, five others are ranked as “partly free” (Singapore, Malaysia, Philippines, Kenya, and India) and the remaining three are categorized as “free” (France, UK, and Australia). (Source: freedomhouse.org). More recently, Turkey was also added to the list, having passed the worst version of the NetzDG, according to the Electronic Frontier Foundation (Source: eff.org)

United States
According to a study that was conducted last year, 85% of daily active Facebook users live outside of the U.S. and Canada, 80% of YouTube users and 79% of Twitter accounts are mainly from up-coming markets such as Brazil, India, and Indonesia. (Source: www.omnicoreagency.com)

While most of these big tech companies have their headquarters in the United States, the majority of their users are based outside the country. As a result, these companies are essentially governed by U.S. law. The First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution and Section 230 are the two principal legal frameworks that regulate the online freedom of expression.

In the U.S., the government is prevented from infringing on the right to free speech by the First Amendment. However, tech companies are not similarly subordinate to the First Amendment. Consequently, they can enact their codes of conduct and policies that often further restrict speech that would not be prohibited by the government under the First Amendment. For instance, Tumblr and Facebook prohibit the publication of graphic nudity on their platforms.

Yet under the First Amendment law, such prohibition by the government would be unconstitutional. And because Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act protects social media networks, website operators, and other intermediaries, they are not held liable for the generated content in their platforms and have been able to thrive.

United Kingdom
To combat detrimental content, the U.K. released a White Paper last year highlighting multiple requirements. Internet companies must keep their platforms safe and can be held accountable for the content published on their platforms and, they are liable to pay consequent fines. (Source: assets.publishing.service.gov.uk)

This article is the second part of a series. If you missed the first part, read it here.

Want to discuss the specificities in your country? Get in touch with our experts to find out more.

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legal framework

Legal frameworks of content moderation around the world (Part 1)

legal framework

Following increased pressure to protect the audience from harmful content, both large and small online platforms that mainly host User Generated Content have come under intense scrutiny from governments around the globe.
Depending on their size and capacity, different online platforms deploy two content moderation models to tackle this issue:

  1. Centralized content moderation – using this approach, companies establish a wide range of content policies they apply on a global scale with exceptions carved out to safeguard their compliance with laws in different jurisdictions. These content policies are implemented by centralized moderators who are trained, managed, and directed as such. Facebook and YouTube are examples of big internet platform companies using this model.
  2. Decentralized content moderation – this model tasks the users with the responsibility of enforcing the policies themselves. Being diverse by nature, this approach mainly enables platforms like Reddit to give their users a set of global policies that serve as a guiding framework.

Centralized models help companies to promote consistency in the adoption of content policies while decentralized models allow a more localized, context-specific, and culture-specific moderation to take place encouraging a diversity of opinions on a platform.
After failed attempts to push social media platforms to self-regulate, the German parliament approved the

Network Enforcement Act (NetzDG) on 30th June 2017. Also known as the “hate speech law” the NetzDG took full effect as from 1st. January 2018. The NetzDG directs platforms to delete terrorism, hate speech, and other illegal contents within 24 hours of being flagged on a platform or otherwise risk hefty fines.

While the NetzDG encourages transparency and accountability of social media platforms it also raises concerns regarding the violation of the e-Commerce Directive and fundamental human rights such as freedom of expression. In a statement that was sent to the German parliament in 2017, Facebook considered the NetzDG draft submitted in 2017, to be incompatible with the German constitution by stating, “It would have the effect of transferring responsibility for complex legal decisions from public authorities to private companies”. (Source: businessinsider.com)

Following criticism from a wide array of activists, social networks, politicians, the EU commission, the UN, and scholars, the NetzDG is a controversial law that should be adapted with a grain of salt. Unintentionally, Germany created a prototype for Global Online Censorship from highly authoritarian states who have adapted the NetzDG to manipulate the freedom of speech on the internet by pushing their illiberal agendas camouflaged as moderation policies.

Find out more about this topic

This article is part of a series looking at legal frameworks around the world. The series will focus on countries legal amendments to moderate user-generated content in the following countries: U.S, U.K., Turkey, Australia, Nigeria, and China.

Want to discuss the specificities in your country? Get in touch with our experts to find out more.

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Webhelp strikes gold at the Engage Awards

Webhelp won the top prizes in the ‘Best Use of Training’ and ‘Best Partnership Solutions During a Crisis’ categories at this year’s Engage Awards. The leading customer experience and business solutions provider also won a silver award for ‘Most Effective Homeworking Programme’.

The gold award for Best Partnership Solution During a Crisis recognised Webhelp and its client Sainsbury’s Bank for developing a homeworking solution in record time. The rapid and smooth nature of that transition and the office-like environment created during the COVID-19 pandemic ensured that Webhelp has been able to continue to respond to more Sainsbury’s Bank customers and provide vital levels of support at a time when consumer demand was growing and COVID-19 was making a huge impact across the sector. This relied on the expertise of Webhelp’s IT team and the flexibility and commitment of everyone involved.

Lesley Millar, Head of Banking and Insurance Services, at Sainsbury’s Bank said: “Webhelp managed to mobilise homeworking for the entire contact centre over the course of a weekend, to help maintain a strong service to our customers and keep our colleagues safe. This was, for me, our most impressive and memorable response. This award celebrates a partnership that is a perfect fit for us. Not only is Webhelp aligned to our values, but its teams’ response to changing demands and priorities is exceptional.”

Webhelp’s Operational Learning and Development (L&D) team also won first prize in the Best Use of Training category, having moved from digital training at a baseline of less than 5% to a fully virtual solution in just 14 days. The team provided bespoke and channel-specific training for over 8,000 people working from home. Critical training was delivered to 1,500 new and displaced colleagues to support campaign redeployment and successful homeworking. The L&D team upskilled over 50 trainers into a virtual environment and created and deployed 85 core digital learning modules, along with 25 digital compliance courses.

The company also achieved the Most Effective Homeworking Programme silver award for keeping its people in the UK, South Africa and India safe during the pandemic while maintaining operational integrity for Webhelp clients. With over 12,000 employees, it was a substantial and complex challenge, which involved finding solutions for 2,150 colleagues in India within five days and 2,200 in South Africa in only three days.

David Turner, Webhelp UK Region CEO, said: “These awards emphasise the strength of the capabilities within our business and the dedication of our highly skilled colleagues. This year, more than ever before, we have seen the benefits of our commitment to making business more human. Webhelp’s game-changers accepted the challenges presented by the pandemic and embraced new solutions to ensure that we kept delivering for our clients. We are all so pleased that our teams’ efforts have received this recognition at the Engage Awards. It marks another special moment on Webhelp’s journey of rapid growth and constant innovation.”

The Engage Awards are recognised by the industry as the only awards programme, celebrating excellence in both Customer and Employee Engagement. The programme captures examples of excellence from organisations and individuals directly improving their strategies, retention, loyalty, productivity and bottom line performance.


Black Friday, the retail rush in the COVID era

Black Friday is an American consumer institution, where hordes of shoppers traditionally lined the streets waiting for the stores to open the day after Thanksgiving to pick up what they hope will be the bargain of a lifetime. In recent years Black Friday, closely followed by Cyber Monday, has heralded the global festive shopping rush. Here Brandon Aitken, CCO of Webhelp South Africa and India takes a look at how this year may be different, and the ways which our teams and the retail and logistics industries as a whole are preparing to meet an unprecedented online demand.

In the mainstream media, Black Friday is typically represented by crowded scenes of over-excited and frustrated shoppers, fighting it out for that last item on the shelf and stealing items from each other’s trolleys. But in reality, a huge amount retail activity takes place online, and this figure has been steadily growing.

According to Adobe, in 2019 US Black Friday online sales beat all previous records, at an astonishing $7.4bn, up from $6.2bn in 2018. CNBC reported that Cyber Monday was an even bigger day for online shopping than Black Friday, with sales totalling $9.2bn, up 16.9% on 2018.[1]

And, Barclaycard data reveals that the story was the same in the UK too, with Black Friday sales climbing by 16.5% last year, while Cyber Monday transactions rose by 6.9%. Their CEO Rob Cameron said:

“Our data shows that consumers have not only been buying more, but also spending more than last year – which will no doubt come as welcome news to the retail sector”[2]

It doesn’t take a huge leap to imagine that in 2020, Black Friday will drive even more customers onto their phones, tablets and laptops, as companies attempt to avoid crowded in-store events, to safeguard their customers in the COVID era, without losing retail sales.

With the global high-street restrictions still impacting on brick and mortar profits, a successful Black Friday via online channels is something all retailers will be hoping for.

At Webhelp, we are well prepared for this event. We have a highly successful track record of managing Peak Demand in customer service for the international retail and logistics brands we support. Behind the scenes, this success hinges on an incredible amount of preparation and hard work from our people and of course close collaboration with our clients. If you’d like to know more you can read just a few of our employee stories

We have four customer service centres in SA, offering a blended delivery solution with advisors both working from home and safely on site.  Every year, leading up to the peak period and during the ‘eye of the storm’ we create an exciting atmosphere to support and motivate our people during the toughest time of their working year. We focus on motivation and ensure we reward people for their hard work.

Along with the energy and commitment of our people; technology and adaptability will obviously play a huge part in any response to increased service demands, and have a robust and reliable solution that has performed well both at peak and under crisis during COVID.

Webhelp has over 1,000 people working from home supporting 8 different international retail and logistics clients to ensure we are able to sustain support for their customers, and this can be adjusted in response to the evolving landscape of the pandemic.

The skills and expertise that our teams have shown in quickly reacting to changing customer demands really does set us apart and is reflected in the incredible feedback that we have received from our client partners. Commenting on our joint response to the pandemic Michaela Simpson, Customer Experience Director at Yodel reported that:

 “Suddenly home shopping habits changed completely, as a result we have been effectively running at peak operation, which we usually spend a significant part of the year planning and laying out logistics for. However, we managed to switch this on in just a few hours and since then we have maintained very, very high numbers, well above our plan”.

It’s clear that this year, more than usual, Black Friday and Cyber Monday will create added pressures for the retail and logistics sectors, but in South Africa we have the talent and a stable infrastructure to help create success for our clients by providing their customers with an exceptional on-line shopping experience.

[1] Cyber Monday sales hit record $9.4 billion, Adobe says CNBC.com

[2] Black Friday 2019: What happened, where and why? Barclaycard.com


Webhelp named CXM Leader by Everest Group for the second time in 2020

Following our positioning as a Global Leader in Customer Experience Management (CXM) by the leading analyst, Everest Group, we have now been recognized as a Leader again in its CXM in EMEA Services PEAK Matrix® Assessment 2020, rating high in terms of vision and capability.

This report is an objective recognition of Webhelp’s successful growth strategy, and our unique people-first, end-to-end approach with Skand Bhargava, Vice President, Everest Group saying:

“Webhelp is a leading CXM provider globally, especially in Europe, supported by a large multilingual workforce of more than 60,000 agents. With a focus on digital transformation, CX consulting, and customer journey orchestration, Webhelp has been able to drive exponential growth over the last few years,”

He continues “Further, its deep digital and domain expertise, outcome-focused approach, and strong leadership have allowed it to resiliently navigate the uncertainties created by COVID-19 and continue on its growth journey.”

This result builds on our strong track record in analyst rankings and assessments, and our second year as a Leader in the PEAK Matrix, with Everest Group specifically highlighting our strong coverage in major industry verticals, our geographical delivery footprint, and the value delivered to our clients.

Everest Group defines Leaders as companies that deliver consistent Customer Experience Management (CXM) Services through expansion in new regions, serving various buyer sizes, and delivering high satisfaction scores due to greater technological and advanced digital capabilities.

For this EMEA edition, Everest Group selected 21 organizations to evaluate and compare for their 2020 report based upon the service provider’s market success, vision and strategy, service focus and capabilities, digital and technological solutions, domain investments, and buyer feedback.


OneShot - Dark social

You are certainly missing something; two thirds of content shares take place in private channels. Are people talking about your brand or your product? Is your communication having an impact? If, in order to find out, you analyse your social media traffic with Google Analytics, it will probably only show you a fraction of the stats. Yes, it’s unfortunate, but it’s not a (complete) disaster.

What is it?

Dark social is a sharing space that eludes tracking-standards tools. This content – often copy-pasted links – is shared via SMS, email, private or encrypted messages, etc. That is to say, outside the traditional channels (Twitter, Facebook, a brand’s webpage, etc.). This method of sharing is overwhelmingly dominant. For each piece of content (published on a website) shared on social media, there are seven shared in the background via private messages.

Why does it happen?

For socionauts, sharing is clearly part of the private sphere; almost 70% of all content sharing takes place in private and the rest on public sharing channels. Because we don’t give our best discoveries to just anyone, hence the high informational value of ultra-specific sharing, which also involves seniors more than millennials and Gen Zs. The channels vary, but the rule of thumb, on the other hand, remains firm; only value-added content is shared.

Where do you start?

One way to get the ball rolling is to provide short links that are easy to share, attractive and SEO friendly with tools such as Rebrandly (although its scope is limited). Or to use the share buttons on ShareThis. Or specific analytical tools such as GetSocial. How do we see into private emails or encrypted messages such as WhatsApp or Facebook Messenger? We don’t. Above all, keep publishing value-added content and make it easy to share – never mind if you can’t get an accurate measure of the impact later on.

How can you make a performance lever?

Finance, travel, restaurants… In certain sectors, dark social is the sharing channel of choice. Try to gauge its importance in the sharing habits of your target audience. On this basis, you will possibly rethink your current KPIs, and redefine them. Because dark social is not only the dominant channel on a quantitative level, it also brings you clients and prospective clients who are following the recommendations of a trusted person! And it brings them into the light.

To appease the public, Google has created a dedicated site : “Bien vivre le digital”. (Living happily with digital).

It is highly educational, and it covers and clarifies sensitive subjects.

 

Read the full OneShot article here


OneShot – Win back trust in the era of fake news

We take a look at how the social media landscape is overshadowed by scandals with François-Bernard Huyghe, a specialist in geopolitics, director of research at Iris, expert in influence and disinformation.

Fake news, fake followers, fake influencers, deep fake, etc. Political currents, companies and simple individuals fight to spread their representation of reality and the courses of action. The craziest points of view – conspiracy theories, flat-earthers, anti-vaxxers, and other trolls – bringing together highly active small communities, whose impact is often destructive. In regard to digital technologies, it brings with it an arsenal of highly sophisticated disinformation that is constantly improving and increasingly easy to access. Is there a place for trust among all this?

Fake news, fake followers, fake influencers, deep fake… How did we end up here?
François-Bernard Huyghe: These Anglicisms are recent and numerous: I listed 60 in my essay on fake news (1). They can be found in journalism, politics, geopolitics and even in everyday conversation; so, they are now part of our reality.  Of course, lies and deception go back a long way, but it was in 2016 that the general concern became widespread, with the election of Trump, Brexit, the Facebook-Cambridge Analytica scandal, the Catalonia elections, in Italy, etc. So, we have granted great political power to the spreading of fake news -and other ‘alternative facts’- on social media. To the point that it is a threat to democracies, the media, and ultimately, to trust as a common socio-economic foundation. Thus, we have moved into the era of post-truth. And the context of Covid-19 confirms this point of view; WHO even talks of an ‘infodemic’, with harmful consequences.

Where is trust in social networks and media?
F.-B. H.: Trust in social media has flipped; we’ve gone from a concept, or from a meme, “social networks will establish democracy everywhere”, to “social networks are bringing down democracies”. We started with the idea that social networks provided a freedom of speech that would trouble the powers that be – those of governments and brands, in particular. And this would in turn lead to more lucid citizen-consumers, saner politicians and better-quality products and services. Ultimately it is the opposite that has become widespread. In the case of brands, other negative factors also arose, such as Dieselgate, the leak of personal data, its commercial exploitation, the opaque role of artificial intelligence, fake customer reviews, click farms, etc.

What are the consequences of these disinformation practices for the public?
F.-B. H.: Gafam and social media regularly report on the thousands of harmful messages or fake news that they delete. There is also corrective intervention from fact-checking experts or bodies, such as AFP Fact Check, partly financed by Facebook, whose new role is “to refute anything that did not happen”. However, despite this refutation, those who manipulate opinions are well aware that there is still some doubt. As Hannah Arendt already said, “When everyone lies to you constantly, the result is not that you believe these lies but no one believes anything anymore… And with such a people, you can do whatever you want.” Ultimately, the most serious aspect is not any particular fake news article; it is the torrent of them that has had a toxic impact on our minds. Citizen-consumers find themselves overwhelmed with doubt, with an inability to learn and act, which leads to frustration or even anger. Take a look at the USA, where Trump has attacked Twitter, while the social network was doing its job of moderating; it is like the start of a soap opera about freedom to express anything and everything, in other words, to misinform with impunity.

What kind of influence is legitimate in the eyes of the public?
F.-B. H. : We have gone from a time when mass media would publish a message in line with that of esteemed opinion leaders, and we have now arrived – through this crisis of general trust – at a strong legitimacy of nano and micro-influencers. Therefore, over prestige and authority, we now prefer proximity; people who talk to me should be people like me. They and I, we should find ourselves on a level playing field. Hence, also, a form of insularity. The citizen-consumer is eventually stuck between individualism and tribalism. Because a tribe is still necessary in order to feel valued within their choices and their identity. Consequently, speeches that often end up getting through are not those of the experts or the established authorities; instead they are the simple opinions or the raw emotions of ‘real’ people.

How can we rebuild trust?
F.-B. H.: On the part of the companies and brands, it seems wiser to establish horizontal and genuine links with consumers, rather than try to create messages that descend towards ‘the old style’. This probably happens through the human dimension, proximity, localness, transparency, proof, the personalisation of relationships, and by approaches that are more micro than macro. But, in a context of economic revival, they will have to ask questions about a shift in production, of real needs versus luxuries and ostentatiousness, of meaning and values, of the company’s social and ecological role, etc. Is it time for certain brands to make an ethical change and to become companies with a mission? It is worth thinking about.

(1) The term fake news, ‘infox’ or ‘fausses nouvelles’ in French, refers to untruthful information that is spread in order to manipulate or mislead the public.

“Over prestige and authority, we now prefer proximity.”

François-Bernard Huyghe

 

Read the full OneShot article here


Content Management

The DSA – a newfound content moderator

Strengthening the responsibility towards online platforms, the DSA could be the newfound content moderator.

As the digital economy continues to grow and evolve rapidly, it becomes more imperative for platforms to manage the content they have on their websites.

The Digital Services Act (DSA) is part of the EU’s digital strategy to regulate the online ecosystem. Clarifying rules that propose a new liability framework for online platforms and the content hosted on their sites.

We could wonder – “How does this differ to GDPR?”: GDPR aims to protect customers’ personal data at the forefront of every business. It is the EU legislation that regulates how organizations use personal data, but it does not regulate the content that is shown online to customers. This is where the DSA comes into action.

The European Commission announced the DSA as being a package formed of two pillars proposing the following new frameworks:

  1. New rules framing the responsibilities for digital services – protecting customers in the digital ecosystem when it comes to user-generated content and new risks that may arise on these platforms
  2. Ex-ante rules for large online platforms that act as gatekeepers to ensure platforms act fairly and challenged by new entrants – the market stays competitive and innovative, so customers get the widest choice.

This is not to say it does not come with its own limitations and challenges. These new provisions can facilitate users to identify issues and risks that is indistinct with the current regulations. It augments more attention to platforms’ guidelines and safety measures.

It is crucial these online intermediaries take responsibility and introduce trained content moderators to avoid these potential faults.

Growing liability for online platforms and digital gatekeepers

Online intermediaries have been protected by the e-Commerce Directive against content liability, enabling these providers to establish their own content moderation regulations.

Social media is one of the most popular ways for users to spend their time and engage with people. It has become an integrated communication tool for people to connect with others and express public opinions. From their personal views in politics or about a product they recommend (49% of consumers depend on influencers recommendations on social media according to Oberlo). Statista states Facebook has 2.7 billion monthly active user’s vs Instagram with 1 billion monthly active users.

Social media user-generated content statistics show daily:

  • Every 60 seconds there are more than 317,000 status updates and 54,000 links shared on Facebook
  • 94 million photos and videos are shared on Instagram

The virality of content can be constructive as well as destructive. With the current regulation for the interdependence of these large platforms, it does not allow for legal reprisals and liability.

According to the DSA, a new standard for large platforms that act as digital gatekeepers will attempt to impose tech regulators with the power to enforce rules where content could be deemed illegal or inflammatory. Creating a fairer, and more competitive market for online platforms in the EU.

Implementing these new standards requires content management services to support focusing on the right content for your business. Poorly handled owned content can be pernicious and potentially discriminating.

Adapting the DSA on a global scale

Online platforms are key drivers of digital trade, innovation, and globalization.

The EU is an attractive market that was the motivation for GDPR scope to become transnational as compliance is required when companies encounter EU citizens personal data. Consequently, forcing international firms to adapt to these regulations.

As with the DSA, the intention is to improve the supervision on digital services and to help protect EU citizens across the single market.

The framework offers benefits to sellers and consumers, with an attraction to different gatekeepers in the market as the digital ecosystem continues to grow and broaden its reach. The DSA introduces broad derogations for members discretion – the UK is not obliged to follow these regulations due to Brexit, as the UK’s transition period ends before 2020. Nonetheless, this package requires harmonization between the UK, EU, and even international platforms to obtain the balance of legal protection of responsibilities to protect its customers.

Our services

The DSA invites more regulation for online platforms, but this cannot be transformed in the current way content is moderated. It requires dexterity and vigour.

Putting our people and our clients at the heart to ensure we build trust, and a safe user experience is part of our think-human approach – 74% of our operators recommend Webhelp as an employer (NPS). Our teams are trusted to detect and assess issues for user generated content with our content moderators, as well as finding the right content for your brand with our content management service. We have managed 1 billion pieces of content in 25 languages every year with flexible operations onsite and homeworking. This role is time-consuming and requires attentiveness, so it is important for us to provide our content moderators with mental health support.

We focus on our robust processes and in-house technological solutions to ensure a smooth delivery of outcomes and a high productivity rate to deliver on objectives.

Are you interested in how the DSA may affect your organization? Talk to us today about how Webhelp’s Content Management services can help you.


OneShot Influence

Influence- New edition of the OneShot

Our 5th edition of OneShot is here! We hope you will enjoy reading about this wide theme, so deeply rooted in our everyday life.

So what have you learned from the crisis? Many attests to the irony of social distancing strengthening bonds and communications between colleagues. At the heart of this new dynamic, digital relationships have Intensified, and digital technology has played a very significant role.

The health and economic crisis is forcing us to focus on the immediate future. Nonetheless brands shouldn’t lose sight of other changes in society. Old power – no business will survive if it’s purely based on old power values: formal and centralised governance, a secretive mindset, the elitism of experts. People no longer trust authority, the bedrock of old powers. They want to act, to participate and to learn. New Power – requires brands to focus more on flat hierarchies and complete transparency.

Did you know that just behind WhatsApp, TikTok is the second-most downloaded non-gaming app in the world? And when compared to Instagram, the engagement rate is much higher? With millions of subscribers and a wide fan base, you should definitely check it out if your target audience is on TikTok.

Read all about these exciting and thought-provoking topics and more, in our latest edition of OneShot.

Read our OneShot