Peer Hackman joins as Managing Director of Telecommunications, Media and Technology Practice

Webhelp and Gobeyond Partners are pleased to announce the expansion of their Telecommunications, Media and Technology Practice, under the leadership of Peer Hackman.

Peer joins Webhelp as Managing Director for TMT. He brings a wealth of knowledge to the business with over 20 years’ experience in leadership, consulting and operational roles with CSPs, technology vendors, management consultancies and media start-ups.

He is supported by a global team of industry consultants, customer experience specialists, customer engagement operations experts, analysts, data scientists and engineers, who work with our clients to transform and create value from customer engagement and experience engineering. This practice brings together specialists who transform customer experience excellence into profitable growth and run your customer operations at greater efficiency and lower costs.

 

Commenting on the TMT expansion, David Turner, CEO of Webhelp UK said:

“Telecommunications is a diverse and hugely important sector of the global economy, which has provided a crucial  role during the pandemic in keeping individual and businesses connected, media companies entertaining and informing us, and technology vendors providing the devices and infrastructure. However, the gap between these sectors in shareholder returns has widened. All businesses have realised that customer engagement, experience and trust is THE decisive enabler to produce sustainable growth and expansion in uncertain times. Peer and his practice are working with leading operators, media businesses and technology vendors to help them mature their digital transformations across strategy, customer engagement, operations, culture, technology and data, to build sustainable, resilient and highly profitable future-facing businesses.”

 

Peer Hackman, Managing Director for TMT, continues:

“Webhelp and Gobeyond Partners provide end-to-end capabilities – from assessing our clients’ digital and CX maturity, to helping them to shape their customer engagement strategy to drive business performance, to engineering profitable customer experiences and providing holistic customer engagement solutions. We are uniquely placed to deliver transformative programmes which help clients grow the value of their existing customers, open new market opportunities, drive down the cost base, increase revenue and improve customer satisfaction.

“I’m delighted to be joining the team at Webhelp and Gobeyond Partners and look forward to bringing customer engagement transformation solutions to the often complex challenges faced by their prestigious client base.”

 

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Debt collection and people

Collection of overdue payments: effective and people-friendly solutions based on Commitment, Innovation and Solidarity

Debt collection and people

In a difficult social context, a new model for collecting overdue payments is needed. More people-friendly, but no less effective, the new model has three focuses: Engagement, Innovation and Solidarity, as explained during a Smart Session given by Franck Etienne, General Manager of Collections Services – Customer Financial Experience products at Webhelp Payment Services.

Methods of collecting overdue payments are changing. They are adapting to a difficult social context, scarred by both an economic and a medical crisis. For businesses, the situation is worrying and delicate: what’s the best way to make it work? In-house or with a specialist partner?

Experience shows it is wise to re-organise the model around three focuses: Commitment, Innovation and Solidarity.

 

1. Commitment: to make collection advisors more effective

As professionals, collection advisors are accountable for the advice they provide, i.e. what they say to a client. Ultimately, this responsibility falls on the partner company. So the initial training and then daily coaching of these teams is crucially important.

Every day, these advisors are dealing with people who are struggling or unwilling to pay. So they are “on the front line”, displaying the brand image of the company seeking payment. Therefore, the advisors need to be extremely careful when using the three traditional phases – case analysis, listening and finding solutions! In addition, monitoring, listening and measuring systems need to be set up and properly managed.

Overall, the advisor must feel fully accountable and committed to his actions, completely consistent with his colleagues and managers and within the “spirit of the brand”.

From the customer’s viewpoint, it would be inadmissible for the credit company to provide responses which varied with the contact person or the communication channel (email, mail, SMS, etc.).

This concept of advisors’ professional commitment must be reconciled with the concept of trust.

Typically, the business of collection starts with fairly rigid call scripts. Exchanges between the advisor and the client are structured as they progress – which is very reassuring for a newly recruited advisor, for example.

However, switching as quickly as possible to other methods, such as the mind map,is recommended. This very practical and powerful technique makes it possible to visualise the client’s thoughts and behaviours. It is a live, adaptable method that benefits from exchanges between the various parties involved. This free flow of ideas makes it possible to emulate and constantly improve, increasing the competence and confidence of advisors – which ultimately results in greater efficiency.

And of course, in a context of working from home, whether hybrid or full time, this concept of trust between advisors and managers has become a key point of collective efficiency – the manager’s adaptability also being crucially important.

This new organisational situation will probably be perpetuated in many companies, the aim being a “triple win'” where everyone benefits: employee, creditor and end customer.

To meet this commitment challenge, a healthy trust between employee and manager needs to be put in place, rather than “command and control”!

 

2. Innovation: so that the advisor optimises the collection strategy

Too often, the keyword “innovation” is associated with new digital tools. This should not be exclusive: social innovation must remain the priority, as technology is there to be used for human performance.

For example, when carrying out data management analysis for our customers, we study many variables: profiles of overdue customers, behaviours and reactions to requests, analysis of reachability, creditworthiness, payments, etc.

In our experience, for this data analysis to be effective, it must be cross-referenced with analysis of the actual experiences of advisors and their managers.

What we find is that, over and above raw and quantitative data, it is the quality of the human interaction that makes the difference.

Thus the advisor has a key role in realising and optimising brand strategy. However, it should not in any circumstance be considered rigid, definitive and mechanically employed in a “top down” manner.

To return to the concept of technological innovation, let’s not forget we are now at the stage of enhanced advisor. This means the advisor can rely on a variety of automated business process solutions (or RAP for Robotic Automisation Process).

In practice, some repetitive or low value-added tasks are handled automatically, either totally or partially. This usually but not always refers to back office areas.

For example, there are real-time monitoring and re-transcription systems for conversations between advisor and client. They provide indicators that tell you about the quality of the conversation, such as its emotional content.

These monitoring tools can also offer the advisor tools to help with decision-making or discussion.

However, these tools should be studied or implemented with care. Within the Webhelp Group, experiments are underway, particularly in Nordic countries.

Measuring the implementation costs for these solutions is essential. In addition to direct costs associated with the acquisition and technical operation of these solutions, there are organisational costs to be included. These enhanced advisor solutions require very specific HR and managerial support. Careful preparation and then testing are required to create the expected added value!

Finally, technological innovation also applies to the omni-channel advisor. This advisor no longer only handles outgoing calls; he also handles incoming calls, emails, chat conversations, and sometimes even mail. This has led to the growing importance of writing in recruitment and training processes for collection advisors.

3. Solidarity: for empathetic support in line with brand values

Solidarity is traditionally defined by concepts of “social duty, reciprocal obligation, help and assistance, courteous collaboration between people in a community… “.

The brand must position itself clearly in relation to this fundamental value. This is even a priority in certain professions, such as mutual organisations and insurance companies for example.

And so in 2021, and probably in 2022, the brand will ask the question: “how are we to approach our clients who are suffering hardship in such a stressful social, health and economic context?”.

For its part, for several years now Webhelp Payment Services has been working in partnership with Crésus,a federation of 24 regional associations. Their mission is to help people who are in over-indebted or suffering financial problems. They also play a role in providing information on excessive debt and its prevention.

For example, this partnership has made it possible to measure people’s level of fragility in order to inform collection services and allow referral to appropriate support services.

In certain sectors of activity, this value of solidarity also enables the brand to play an advisory role–going as far as providing coaching. In addition, experiments between Crésus and Webhelp Payment Services will be extended during 2021.

Similarly, the idea of solidarity applies to teams of advisors engaged in a collective effort to improve service and share best practice.

To sum up, although there is a certain amount to be collected, it is possible – and probably desirable – to bring people into the relationship, while relying on technologies and tools that enhance that relationship.

It is also this empathy and this search for human solutions that over time will lead to a good and lasting relationship with the customer and a positive brand image! A relationship to everyone’s benefit!

 

To find out more about this topic


Outsourcing your customer relationship for your startup: good idea or big mistake?

In the early years of building a startup, challenges are everywhere: providing the best customer experience to your customers, keeping the right focus to innovate on products and services, recruiting the best talents, accelerating your time to market, expanding internationally, formalizing your processes while maintaining flexibility…

While customer relationship outsourcing could be a solution to many of these challenges, some startups are still unaware of the benefits of such a service or are hesitant to use it for maturity, growth strategy reasons etc.

Here are some tips to understand if customer relationship outsourcing is a good idea or not to support the growth of your startup (to be challenged of course!)

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Bots, Bias & Bigotry: safe scaling of AI

In the first of our Risk & Innovation series, James Allen examines the barriers to overcome when scaling AI.

Now that we’re well into the fourth Industrial Revolution (also known as Industry 4.0), we expect to see some fundamental shifts in how businesses operate and serve their customers.

Here’s what we see as the three big pillars of Industry 4.0:

  1. Digitisation of product and service offerings
  2. Digitisation and integration of supply / value chains
  3. Digital business models and customer access

 

The shift toward Industry 4.0 has become more important to many brands, and has accelerated during the Covid crisis as a result of significant changes in supply chain and consumer behaviour.

In fact, a recent McKinsey survey highlighted that 65% of respondents see Industry 4.0 as being more valuable since the pandemic, with the same survey revealing that the top 3 strategic objectives for Industry 4.0 are:

  1. Agility to scale operations up or down in response to market-demand changes (18.4%)
  2. Flexibility to customize products to consumer needs (17.2%)
  3. Increase operational productivity and performance to minimise costs (17.2%)

Yet when the same respondents were asked if they had successfully scaled Industry 4.0 initiatives, only 26% had managed to do so successfully.

 

According to Rothschild & Co, the market for Industry 4.0 is expected to top 300 billion dollars, and with AI and connectivity projected to reduce manufacturing costs by 20% (or 400 billion dollars), it’s essential that companies find a way to scale safely, at pace.

Artificial Intelligence evolution

AI has been in development for years, starting with the first computers in the 1940, with which scientists and mathematicians began to explore the potential for building an electronic brain. In 1950, the “Turing Test” proposed that if a machine could carry on a conversation that was indistinguishable from a conversation with a human being, then it was reasonable to say that the machine was “thinking”. This simplified version of the problem allowed Alan Turing to argue convincingly that a “thinking machine” was at least plausible, and the paper answered all the most common objections to the proposition.

Fast forward many years, and many millions of pounds of research investment, and in 1997 perhaps the first publicly recognised AI computer was developed. This came from IBM in the form of Deep Blue – a chess-playing computer that beat the reigning world chess champion Garry Kasparov.

But machines like Deep Blue were incredibly complex, extremely expensive, and inaccessible to all but a few large technology companies. In the past few years, however, the interest and opportunity presented by AI within Industry 4.0 has exploded.

This is due to a number of factors:

  • Wider availability of computing and access to cloud environments with large processing power
  • Development of deep learning algorithms
  • Big Data platforms
  • Development of Artificial General Intelligence

AI – learnings and barriers to scale

Whilst many companies see the potential presented by AI, companies are also rightly concerned by the risks that it presents, as well as the barriers they need to overcome when scaling.

The most common challenges we tend to come across are:

  • Access to specialist skills
  • Cost of processing in cloud environments
  • Inability to demonstrate fairness, lack of bias and integrity of AI algorithms
  • Risk of unintended consequences
  • Regulatory understanding
  • Ability to seamlessly switch between AI powered processes and regular business processes in the event the AI fails

This presents organisations with a real conundrum. AI use raises questions over ethics, safeguards, interpretability and more. It’s only right that organisations probe these issues and take the learnings from those that have gone before them.

Here’s a few public examples of where AI has gone wrong:

Footballer or felon

A facial-recognition system identified almost thirty professional American footballers as criminals, including New England Patriots three-time Super Bowl champion Duron Harmon. The software incorrectly matched the athletes to a database of mugshots in a test organized by the Massachusetts chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). Nearly one in six athletes were falsely identified.

CEO gets spoofed

In 2019 the CEO of a UK-based energy firm got a call from his boss at their German parent company, instructing him to transfer €220,000 to a Hungarian supplier. The ‘boss’ said the request was urgent and directed the UK CEO to transfer the money promptly. It turned out the phone call was made by criminals who used AI-based software to mimic the boss’ voice, including the “slight German accent and the melody of his voice,” as reported in the Wall Street Journal. Such AI-powered cyberattacks are a new challenge for companies, as traditional cybersecurity tools designed for keeping hackers off corporate networks can’t identify spoofed voices.

Get me out of here!

US airlines were subject to widespread criticism after their AI powered pricing systems charged customers up to 10 times the price of a regular ticket, as they desperately tried to escape Florida ahead of the arrival of hurricane Irma. The systems did not have a kill switch. “There are no ethics valves built into the system that prevent an airline from overcharging during a hurricane,” said Christopher Elliott, a consumer advocate and journalist.

 

Navigating the risks and enabling safe scaling of AI

Webhelp and Gobeyond Partners have developed a comprehensive framework to support the safe scaling of AI, including assessment of risk, key controls, human-centred ethics principles, algorithm management and data handling. This framework includes open source methods that can be used to demonstrate the integrity and explainability of AI algorithms.

Safe scaling of AI

Questions your organisation should consider

Although AI presents a huge opportunity to transform both business operations and customer experience, this is not without risk. Here are some of the long term strategic questions that we recommend you consider, for your organisation:

  • What role does AI have in the working environment and is there such a thing as a post-labour economy? If so, how do we make it fair?
  • How do we eliminate bias in AI?
  • How do we keep AI safe from threats?
  • Is it right to use AI in cyber defence? If so, where is the line?
  • As AI capabilities become more integrated, how do we stay in control of such a complex system?
  • How do we define the humane treatment of AI?

 

Feel free to get in touch, to see how we can help you safely fulfil your Industry 4.0 ambitions at pace and at scale.


Stricter content moderation policies puts pressure on social media platforms

Growing concerns towards content moderation policies aroused over the last few years due to scandals, users, and politics. Subsequently, there have been growing concerns about Content Moderation (CoMo) policies and enforcement on social media platforms. Today, we are dealing with how world-renowned social media platforms enforce their Content Moderation policies, as opposed to  how governments or institutions desire them to (See Article). Bear in mind that in most countries, these platforms are not immediately liable for their User-Generated-Content (UGC); Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act of 1996 in the United States is a great example of this ’liability shield’:

When it comes to terrorism or other threats to users, several countries like members of the EU, Brazil and Australia impose a time limit for platforms to delete content after it has been flagged as inappropriate.

With platforms not immediately liable for their User Generated Content, why are huge corporations enforcing stricter policies, raising censorship concerns ? Why don’t they just leave their communities to live freely? They need to for two main reasons:

  1. To protect their communities from violence, hate speech, racism, harassment and so many more threats to ensure a smooth user experience
  2. Protect individuals on their platforms from being influenced by other users who might spread misleading information or leverage the network to influence their decisions and behaviors

But as you will discover in this article, some platforms endure growing scrutiny from their audience due to their huge reach, whilst others might benefit from different levels of acceptance to convey a somewhat brand image.

Scrutiny makes social media leaders tighten their CoMo policies

The former is the case, especially for both Facebook and Twitter. Their billions of daily users have the ability to influence mass opinions – far more easily than any other type of media. Following several scandals, trust between these platforms and their users has been damaged (link to WH article). In fact, when interrogated in a hearing by the US Senate last October, leaders of Twitter, Google, and Facebook were pointed out as “Powerful arbiters of truth”, a rather explicit denomination.

Content Moderation has wide political implications. Last year’s American elections played out a bigger trial for large tech platforms showing how they were able to monitor the peaks of political comments, ads, and other UGC, safely and considerately. Numerous examples of Content Moderation can be cited as no political ads on Facebook: first flagging Donald Trump’s tweets as misleading or partly false before permanently banning the former US president on both platforms.

TikTok has also been questioned several times regarding their moderation of political content, but most importantly almost live suicides, paedophilia, and increased usage of guns in the videos were posted by their users. Further to political aspects, the reasons why these types of content should be deleted and not seen by the communities is straightforward. When it comes to firearm usage, local laws make it even more unclear on how to moderate the use and applications of these types of weapons online.

Logically, the pattern rubs off on smaller players

Most Big Tech giants have now funded Safety Advisory Councils generally – “made up of external experts on child safety, mental health and extremism”, signaling to their communities that they are trying their best to protect them while avoiding censorship and audience attrition.

Due to the attention their bigger peers face, targets of the proposed tighter Content Moderation policies are progressing towards them. Platforms such as Parler advocate free speech and use it to promote their brand image, while welcoming the most extreme far-right supporters, whose comments are widely moderated on Twitter and other mainstream social

After Parler was banned from most well-known online app stores (Amazon, Apple, Google, who are the main providers of these apps) due to its lack of Content Moderation, it was forced to go offline and its now-former CEO, John Matze, has been fired over his push for stronger moderation. There are several other social media platforms claiming to promote free speech (Telegram, Gab), but some have chosen bravely to take on the Content Moderation challenge to avoid Parler’s faith.

Nonetheless, such patterns are already observed for new and innovative social media, including Substack (newsletter developing platform) and the infamous Clubhouse (live audio conferences). The former was not expecting such controversy about one of their newsletters until one of its previous releases linked IQ to race. The latter poses new questions on how to efficiently moderate live audio feeds.

Mastering Content Moderation policies is the key to success

The scale of emerging social media platforms, as well as their innovative format and technology imposes new challenges on Content Moderation, which is evidently highlighted by increased scrutiny from users. Unfortunately, without benefiting from years of experience in Content Moderation, newcomers, and smaller players find that their policy is adapted to their own targeted communities, as well as their content. If both areas are too permissive or restrictive, they become dangerous for their longevity and brand image.

Mastering Content Moderation enforcement is a lever to the welfare of your community and reputation.


 

Author

Thomas Japy

Digital Content Services Business Analyst

Contact the author

Innovation

Innovation is necessary, safety is crucial

James Allen, Webhelp’s Chief Risk & Technology Officer, introduces our new series taking a deep dive into risk and innovation.

Risk and Innovation don’t tend to appear in the same sentence very often. Innovation is, of course, essential for businesses aiming to survive and thrive in the 4th Industrial Revolution. But with an increasing weight of regulation, and with data becoming more valuable than oil, how can companies simultaneously innovate while staying ahead of emerging threats?

Here at Webhelp and Gobeyond Partners, our mission is to be leaders and experts in delivering low risk solutions that help our clients to innovate and stay safe.

In this new series, we’ll be providing some insight and perspective into some of the key questions that we work to solve in partnership with our clients.

  • AI has huge potential to transform customer experience in my business. But how do I safely move from small scale experimentation to deployment at scale?
  • In a world of increasing regulatory burden, how can I use digital technology to automate compliance activities?
  • My firm is part of a critical national infrastructure, but I have a large amount of legacy applications that provide critical economic functions. How can I accelerate transformation of my business without putting these at risk?
  • My business has made massive investments in digitisation, but my control environment is still analogue. How do I pivot to the new without losing control?
  • How do I attract new skills in digital, analytics and cyber into my Risk function?
  • Now that home working is part of the new norm, how do I deliver leading edge cyber security with world-class colleague experience?

Innovation

End-to-end collaboration

By encouraging and facilitating collaboration between different teams, this helps teams reach outside their own comfort zones, think differently, and better consider the customer and colleague experience from beginning to end.

 

Understanding new technology

New developments in technology are the cornerstone to enabling businesses to innovate, operate effectively, and react quickly. But with the adoption of new technology inevitably come new risks, and new challenges. Foremost importance should be placed on understanding these implications, and ensuring the safe deployment of the new technology.

 

At Webhelp, we work every day to drive innovation, with control by design. We adapt and innovate – in our technology, our mindset and our operational practices – and continue to push the boundaries of what we can do for our clients. But at the heart of everything we do is a focus on delivering low risk solutions, helping our clients to innovate while remaining safe, now and in the future.

 

In Risk & Innovation, our new series of articles and white papers, we’ll be exploring how emerging technologies can be used to help companies stay safe while maintaining necessary growth and agility. The first in the series, Bots, Bias & Bigotry- Safe scaling of AI, will arrive on Monday March 22, and will address the fairness, privacy and operational safeguards you need to consider when incorporating AI into your operational model.

Interested in more content from our thought-leader James Allen? Check out his earlier pieces on Taking a human centred approach to cyber security and How AI and data analytics can support vulnerable customers.


Digital content significance on second-hand car platforms

Revealing why consumer content is instrumental in influencing both purchase decision making and in the uptake, visibility and popularity of brands online.

The trust and safety of users online is crucial in today’s digital world. Technology is disrupting businesses, so to ensure customers are provided with a safe and painless journey, it requires a balance of technology and human intervention.

This paper looks at some of the pain points in the the automotive industry space, highlighting the typical industry reactions and insights into how Webhelp can offer a comprehensive and game changing solution.

Download insights

KYC

B-Case – How does a bank manage KYC in a B2C marketplace… by using a non-dissuasive process?

Webhelp KYC bank

Webhelp supported a major international bank to manage all financial flows for its B2C marketplace customers through its specialised internal electronic money institution. Webhelp KYC Services carried out the entire vendor identification and onboarding process : a solution that means it was able to validate more than 10,000 vendors worldwide in just a few months.

This bank’s B2C marketplace customers offer their platform to thousands of vendors from around the world.

  • This sector of activity is regulated by the Sapin II law, which targets money laundering and financing of terrorism. Non-compliance fines are on the rise and are expected to exceed $400 billion by 2020 in Europe and the US.
  • This regulation requires that sellers and beneficiaries must have been formally identified by a KYC procedure (Know Your Customer) before they can operate in the marketplace.


The bank
 does not have an international task force to manage the KYC vendor registration process in the marketplace.

  • Legal constraint: where the vendor is a legal entity, beneficiaries must be personally identified when registering and then periodically as soon as they hold more than 25% of the capital.
  • The specific language and administrative requirements of each vendor’s country of origin must be taken into consideration.
  • Each country has its own specific requirements regarding connections to administrative databases.
  • Procedures for identifying and onboarding vendors must be fast and efficient enough not to be dissuasive, and reliable enough to comply with regulations.


In order to manage
 complex, multilingual and multi-country KYC procedures, Webhelp KYC Services has developed a project methodology that was rolled out in seven weeks. The organisation is based on five simultaneously processed areas: data collection (HMI), exchange security, APIs, acceptance rules, and management of reminders. Using our multilingual KYC hub, KYC identification operations can be managed in over 40 countries and in 15 languages. This takes into account each country’s specific administrative requirements and the KYC validation practices particular to the ordering parties. Generally speaking, only 55% of onboarding files are complete the first time around: Webhelp KYC Services uses a reminder program to optimise file completion.

The +: Onboarding a new vendor takes just a few minutes. Additional human verification, when necessary, is carried out in under twenty four hours.

“Unique in the market, our People & Solution procedure combines two components: a dedicated technical platform and multilingual operators trained in KYC verifications. It makes it possible to operate a multilingual, multi-country KYC service with a file rejection rate of less than five per cent.”

Hervé de Kermadec, president of Webhelp KYC Services


KYC know your customer

Whitepaper: Using KYC to deliver competitive differentiation

KYC know your customer

Revealing why KYC is no longer just a regulatory requirement but a matter of competitive survival

The process of knowing your customer, commonly shortened to KYC, describes the actions that organisations undertake to verify the identity of their customers. Regulatory compliance is fundamental to an effective KYC operation, but it is only the start.

As brands undergo rapid and necessary digital transformation in response to COVID-19, the importance of the experience created during the KYC process must not be overlooked. From regulation to differentiation, the customer must still be at the heart of the KYC journey.

KYC processes are increasingly viewed as competitive differentiators, for both clients and consumers alike across multiple industries. KYC can be flexed to provide differentiation linked to an organisation’s broader strategy, whether that is delivering a seamless journey for customers, rapid response times or reduced cost.

In this paper, authored by Senior Account Directors Ali Fry and Virginie Raux at Gobeyond Partners, part of the Webhelp group, we review the impact of new technologies, lessons learnt from other digital industries, and two key focus areas for KYC improvement activity.


social media

Webhelp Ranked Highly Across all Aspects of Social Media by Leading Analyst NelsonHall

social media

Firm announces host of analyst accolades 

Paris, France , 11 February 2021  

The leading global customer experience (CX) and business solutions provider, Webhelp has been recognized by top-ranking industry analyst, NelsonHall, for its social media capabilities. 

The firm was recognized across three core areas: customer care and sales capability; online reputation management capability; and content moderation, trust and safety capability.  

NelsonHall’s Evaluation & Assessment Tool (NEAT), part of a “speed-to-source” initiative, enables strategic sourcing managers to assess vendors’ capabilities to identify the industry’s best performers during the sourcing selection process. The methodology specifically evaluates the quality of players’ abilities in several categories, such as technology and tools, service innovation, geographic footprint, and scalability, amongst others. 

“We are thrilled that NelsonHall has recognized our social media capabilities. Now more than ever, and in an increasingly digital world, businesses need to deliver high-quality and trustworthy customer experience interactions. Webhelp has a diverse range of digitally enabled services, which allow us to support global brands with their social media interactions and reputation and work with social media platforms and marketplaces themselves to support a safer online environment for users. We are very proud of our achievements in this space,” said Webhelp Co-Founder Olivier Duha.  

Ivan KotzevNelsonHall CX Services analyst, said:

“Webhelp’s strong performance in social media support and sales is built on a fundament of proprietary technology, channel management experience, and CX consulting capability. Notable is the company’s expertise in lead generation and sales activities on social channels, an increasing priority for brands looking to meet their customers on these channels.” 

Webhelp’s extensive capabilities and growing global footprint continue to be validated by the analyst community, with esteemed U.S.-based analyst, Gartner, naming Webhelp as a Niche Player. This builds on the analyst’s reporting of Webhelp as a Rising Star in 2019/20, as the business further establishes its reputation as an industry disrupter and credible alternative to the more traditional players in the North American market. 

These recent accolades amplify Webhelp’s current positioning by global analyst Everest Group as a Leader in Customer Experience Management (CXM) in its PEAK Matrix® Assessment 2020, as well as a Leader in its CXM in Europe, Middle East, and Africa (EMEA) Services PEAK Matrix, recognizing Webhelp as being particularly strong in terms of both vision and capability. The Everest Group positioning extends to a new report where Webhelp is recognized as a Major Contender in work-from-home solutions amongst other global players.  

Everest Group wrote in its WAHA (Work aHome Agent) CXM Services PEAK Matrix Assessment:

“Webhelp is driving digital transformation through cloud adoption, CX consulting, and automation by partnering with technology vendors such as Amazon Connect, MS Azure, and UiPath, utilizing their platforms as per clients requirements.”